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​​​Child Safety Tips
Courtesy of The National Center For Missing and Exploited Children


What are the most important things parents should tell children about safety?
Always check first with a parent, guardian, or trusted adult before going anywhere, accepting anything, or getting into a car with anyone.
Do not go out alone.

Always take a friend with when going places or playing outside.
Say no if someone tries to touch you, or treats you in a way that makes you feel scared, uncomfortable, or confused.
Get out of the situation as quickly as possible.
Tell a parent, guardian, or trusted adult if you feel scared, uncomfortable, or confused. There will always be someone to help you, and you have the right to be safe.


What should a parent know when talking to a child about safety?

Don’t forget your older children. Children aged 11 to 17 are equally at risk to victimization. At the same time you are giving your older children more freedom, make sure they understand important safety rules as well.
Speak to your children in manner that is calm and non-threatening. Children do not need to be frightened to get the point across. In fact, fear can thwart the safety message, because fear can be paralyzing to a child.
Speak openly. Children will be less likely to come to you about issues enshrouded in secrecy. If they feel that you are comfortable discussing the subject at hand, they may be more forthcoming. Do not teach “stranger danger.” Children do not have the same understanding of “strangers” as adults; the concept is difficult for them to grasp. And, based on what we know about those who harm children, people known to children and/or their families actually present greater danger to children than do “strangers.”
Practice what you preach. You may think your children understand your message, but until they can incorporate it into their daily lives, it may not be clearly understood.
Find opportunities to practice “what if” scenarios.
Teach your children that safety is more important than manners. In other words, it is more important for children to get themselves out of a threatening situation than it is to be polite. They also need to know that it is okay to tell you what happened, and they won’t be tattletales.


Is "stranger danger"—that dangers to kids come from strangers—really a myth?
Yes. In the majority of cases, the perpetrator is someone the parents or child knows, and that person may be in a position of trust or responsibility to the child and family. We have learned that children do not have the same understanding of who a stranger is as an adult might; therefore, it is a difficult concept for the child to grasp. It is much more beneficial to children to help them build the confidence and self-esteem they need to stay as safe as possible in any potentially dangerous situation they encounter rather than teaching them to be "on the look out" for a particular type of person. For decades, parents, guardians, and teachers have told children to "stay away from strangers" in an effort to keep them safe. In response to the on-going debate about the effectiveness of such programs, NCMEC released the research-based Guidelines for Programs to Reduce Child Victimization: A Resource for Communities When Choosing a Program to Teach Personal Safety to Children to assist schools as they select curricula aimed at reducing crimes against children.


What other advice can you offer parents about talking to kids?

Parents should choose opportunities or “teachable” moments to reinforce safety skills. If an incident occurs in your community and your child asks you about it, speak frankly but with reassurance. Explain to your children that you want to discuss the safety rules with them, so that they will know what to do if they are ever confronted with a difficult situation.
Make sure you have “safety nets” in place, so that your children know there is always someone who can help them.


What child safety education resources does NCMEC provide?
NCMEC offers a wealth of resources to help educate parents, children, law enforcement, and the general public about child safety. [Safety tips adapted from Know the Rules...General Parental Tips to Help Keep Your Children Safer. Copyright© 2000 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC). All rights reserved.] I heard about a tracking device for children on a commercial. Is there one that NCMEC recommends? Consumers need to understand that the first line of defense for families is safety education and line-of-sight supervision of their children. If a device is to be used, understand what it can do and cannot do, that machines can fail, and that the tracking device should be, if they choose, an element within a complete safety program for their family. Additional safety tips can be found at www.missingkids.com.
About the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®


NCMEC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. NCMEC's congressionally mandated CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation, has handled more than 519,300 leads. Since its establishment in 1984, NCMEC has assisted law enforcement with more than 135,800 missing child cases, resulting in the recovery of more than 118,700 children. For more information about NCMEC, call its toll-free, 24-hour hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit www.missingkids.com. N.C.M.E.C. article/information is the intellectual property of N.C.M.E.C. and subject to their terms of use. This site is not affiliated with or sponsored by N.C.M.E.C.

Deputy Jonathan "Scott" Pine

​Courtesy www.OCSO.com

On the evening of February 11, 2014, Deputy Sheriff Jonathan Scott Pine of the Orange County Sheriff's Office was working patrol on the midnight shift protecting Orange County's southwestern side as a dedicated community servant; when a radio call of a vehicle burglary was broadcast in the Courtleigh Park subdivision. Jonathan was aware that a string of similar burglaries had been occurring in the area and responded to assist in any search or apprehension. A little past midnight, Jonathan radioed in to the agency's communications center that he was making a stop on a suspicious subject. Minutes later the agency received a follow-up radio transmission from Jonathan advising that he was in a foot pursuit of the fleeing suspect when the chase took a tragic turn. As he gave chase, the suspect was able to shoot at and strike Jonathan. As deputies arrived, they found Jonathan seriously wounded and rendered aid. The suspect was located a few homes away from the murder scene with a self-inflicted gunshot wound. A second suspect was arrested on felony charges. Jonathan was rushed to the trauma center, but sadly succumbed to his injuries.

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M.O.S.T. Drug Series - Part 2     U-47700 (Pink)

Courtesy www.Drugs.com Medically reviewed on Nov 28, 2016 by L. Anderson, PharmD   Photo Courtesy 12News.com

Updated 02/11/17:  Home Page, News & Views Page

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Common or street names: Pink, Pinky, U4


What is U-47700 or Pink?
U-47700, also known as “Pink”, "Pinky", or “U4” on the streets, is a synthetic opioid pain medication developed as a dangerous designer drug. Since 2015, reports have surfaced of multiple deaths due to street use of U-47700 or "Pink". Importation into the U.S. is primarily from clandestine chemical labs in China.
U-47700 has been seized by law officials on the street in powder form and as tablets. Typically it appears as a white or light pinkish, chalky powder. It may be sold in glassine bags stamped with logos imitating heroin, in envelopes and inside knotted corners of plastic bags. In Ohio, authorities seized 500 pills resembling a manufacturer’s oxycodone immediate-release tablets, but they were confirmed by chemical analysis to contain “Pink”. U-47700 has also been identified and sold on the Internet misleadingly as a “research chemical” at roughly $30 per gram.
Even small doses can be very toxic or even deadly. Labels on the products may state “not for human consumption” or “for research purposes only”, probably in an effort to avoid legal detection. Fatalities due to U-47700 in the United States join the growing incidence of drug overdose deaths due to prescription opioids and other synthetic designer drugs like “spice” and “bath salts.” The public using these street or Internet products can never know exactly what is in them, how much, or the degree of toxicity with use.


Extent of Pink (U-47700) Use and Health Hazards?
The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) reported at least 46 deaths linked to use of U-47700 that occurred in 2015 and 2016. According to DEA, no other reports of U-47700 use in the U.S. were found prior to 2015.
Populations who abuse U-47700 seem to be similar to those who abuse heroin, prescription pain opioids, designer opioids, and other narcotic-type drugs. Use of this substance may also occur unknown to the user as it may be found in combination with other drugs of abuse bought on the streets, such as heroin or fentanyl. It has also been confiscated as a separate product, as well. Some illicit "Pink" products have been sold to mimic bags of heroin or prescription opioid tablets.
Those who abuse U-47700 may be at risk of addiction and substance abuse disorder, overdose and death, similar to abuse of other narcotic substances. Fatalities have been reported in New York, New Hampshire, Ohio, Texas, and Wisconsin, North Carolina, with multiple reports from state and local forensics laboratories.
These illicit substances originate from overseas and the identity, purity, and quantity of substances in any one product purchased from the street may be unknown. A user may be told the product contains one substance, while in reality it could contain any dangerous chemical.

In July 2016, a toxicology case report was published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine that detailed events in which fentanyl and U-47700 were being sold misleadingly as the prescription opioid pain medication Norco (acetaminophen and hydrocodone) on the streets of Northern and Central California. In one patient who presented to the emergency room, naloxone (Narcan) was administered which reversed respiratory depression and pinpoint pupils. After additional chemical analysis, it was found the “Norco” contained hydrocodone, fentanyl, and U-47700.
Reports indicated that Pink and prescription opioid fentanyl may have been contained in the drug “cocktail” that led to the death of pop star legend Prince in April 2016. In Utah, two 13-year old boys died in September 2016 reportedly due to use of U-47700 purchased from the Internet.


What is the Pharmacology of Pink (U-47700)?
U-47700 (“Pink”) is a novel synthetic opioid agonist with selective action at the mu-opioid receptor. The chemical designation is 3,4-dichloro-N-[2-dimethylamino)cyclohenyl]-N-methylbenzamide, and it was originally developed by chemists at Upjohn Pharmaceuticals in the 1970’s as a potent pain reliever for use in surgery, cancer, or painful injuries. Although it was never commercially made available, the patent and chemical details remained available.
U-47700 has a similar chemical profile as morphine and other mu-opioid receptor agonists; however, it has been reported by the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) that Pink is “far more potent than morphine” -- possibly seven to eight times more potent. However, the strength of the product can never be assured, and may be much stronger, as it is a designer drug made in illegal labs.


What is the Legal Status of Pink (U-47700) in the United States?
On November 14, 2016, the DEA placed U-47700, as well as its related isomers, esters, ethers, and salts into Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act due to an imminent hazard to public safety and health. Substances in schedule I have a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use, and a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision.
Temporary emergency scheduling of dangerous illicit drugs is one tool the DEA uses to help restrict potentially fatal and new street drugs. Scheduling will last at least 24 months, with a possible 12-month extension if the DEA needs more time to determine if the chemical should remain permanently in schedule I. According to the Federal Register, there are no current investigational or approved new drug applications for U-47700 which might hinder its placement in Schedule I. DEA’s Final Order is available in the Federal Register with details on threats to public safety.
Prior to DEA’s scheduling, several states had already outlawed the drug under emergency orders, including Florida, Ohio, Wyoming and Georgia.


What Are Pink (U-47700) Effects and Toxicity?

U-47700 or “Pink” is abused for its opioid and narcotic-like effects, and is swallowed, snorted or injected. It is one of many synthetic designer drugs. Effects as reported by users are similar to the effects of opioids, which might include:


Euphoria and other psychoactive effects
Sedation, relaxation, numbness
Potent analgesia
Severe, possibly fatal respiration depression
Pinpoint pupils
Constipation
Itching
Drug tolerance, addiction
Seizures
Psychosis
Fatal overdose


Do Drug Tests Identify U-47700 Use?
Currently, U-47700 is not included in standard workplace drug screens in the U.S.; however, forensics or medical laboratory testing may identify U-47700 through analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry.


Bottom Line
U-47700, known on the streets as "Pink" or "U4", is a dangerous designer drug exported from illegal labs in China to the U.S. Its effects are of a strong opioid analgesic, and have been reported to be 7 to 8 times more potent than morphine. Authorities in many U.S. cities have reported that Pink is sold on the streets or over the Internet, often promoted as a prescription opioid like Norco, or as heroin. In fact, many of these products have contained the potent designer drug Pink, as well as fentanyl. U-47700 is now illegal in all forms, and the DEA has temporarily placed the substance into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, pending further review, due to an imminent hazard to public safety and health.
Clusters of overdoses and deaths in U.S. cities were reported in 2015 and 2016 with Pink; some in children. According to one case report, the use of naloxone (Narcan) in an emergency setting reversed the effects of U-47700. Emergency physicians should contact their local poison control center, medical toxicologist or public health department in cases where there is a reasonable suspicion of ingestion of designer drugs to help protect the surrounding community. Special lab analysis may be needed to identify drugs like "Pink".
The public should be aware that drugs obtained on the street, even though they look like an authentic prescription medication, may be fake and deadly. Don't take any prescription drug - legal or otherwise - unless it is written for you by a doctor and is dispensed by a reliable pharmacy.

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M.O.S.T. strives to empower Orlando against crime 

 while also assisting law enforcement with information

 disbursement and intel gathering.