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​​​Child Safety Tips
Courtesy of The National Center For Missing and Exploited Children


What are the most important things parents should tell children about safety?
Always check first with a parent, guardian, or trusted adult before going anywhere, accepting anything, or getting into a car with anyone.
Do not go out alone.

Always take a friend with when going places or playing outside.
Say no if someone tries to touch you, or treats you in a way that makes you feel scared, uncomfortable, or confused.
Get out of the situation as quickly as possible.
Tell a parent, guardian, or trusted adult if you feel scared, uncomfortable, or confused. There will always be someone to help you, and you have the right to be safe.


What should a parent know when talking to a child about safety?

Don’t forget your older children. Children aged 11 to 17 are equally at risk to victimization. At the same time you are giving your older children more freedom, make sure they understand important safety rules as well.
Speak to your children in manner that is calm and non-threatening. Children do not need to be frightened to get the point across. In fact, fear can thwart the safety message, because fear can be paralyzing to a child.
Speak openly. Children will be less likely to come to you about issues enshrouded in secrecy. If they feel that you are comfortable discussing the subject at hand, they may be more forthcoming. Do not teach “stranger danger.” Children do not have the same understanding of “strangers” as adults; the concept is difficult for them to grasp. And, based on what we know about those who harm children, people known to children and/or their families actually present greater danger to children than do “strangers.”
Practice what you preach. You may think your children understand your message, but until they can incorporate it into their daily lives, it may not be clearly understood.
Find opportunities to practice “what if” scenarios.
Teach your children that safety is more important than manners. In other words, it is more important for children to get themselves out of a threatening situation than it is to be polite. They also need to know that it is okay to tell you what happened, and they won’t be tattletales.


Is "stranger danger"—that dangers to kids come from strangers—really a myth?
Yes. In the majority of cases, the perpetrator is someone the parents or child knows, and that person may be in a position of trust or responsibility to the child and family. We have learned that children do not have the same understanding of who a stranger is as an adult might; therefore, it is a difficult concept for the child to grasp. It is much more beneficial to children to help them build the confidence and self-esteem they need to stay as safe as possible in any potentially dangerous situation they encounter rather than teaching them to be "on the look out" for a particular type of person. For decades, parents, guardians, and teachers have told children to "stay away from strangers" in an effort to keep them safe. In response to the on-going debate about the effectiveness of such programs, NCMEC released the research-based Guidelines for Programs to Reduce Child Victimization: A Resource for Communities When Choosing a Program to Teach Personal Safety to Children to assist schools as they select curricula aimed at reducing crimes against children.


What other advice can you offer parents about talking to kids?

Parents should choose opportunities or “teachable” moments to reinforce safety skills. If an incident occurs in your community and your child asks you about it, speak frankly but with reassurance. Explain to your children that you want to discuss the safety rules with them, so that they will know what to do if they are ever confronted with a difficult situation.
Make sure you have “safety nets” in place, so that your children know there is always someone who can help them.


What child safety education resources does NCMEC provide?
NCMEC offers a wealth of resources to help educate parents, children, law enforcement, and the general public about child safety. [Safety tips adapted from Know the Rules...General Parental Tips to Help Keep Your Children Safer. Copyright© 2000 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC). All rights reserved.] I heard about a tracking device for children on a commercial. Is there one that NCMEC recommends? Consumers need to understand that the first line of defense for families is safety education and line-of-sight supervision of their children. If a device is to be used, understand what it can do and cannot do, that machines can fail, and that the tracking device should be, if they choose, an element within a complete safety program for their family. Additional safety tips can be found at www.missingkids.com.
About the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®


NCMEC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. NCMEC's congressionally mandated CyberTipline, a reporting mechanism for child sexual exploitation, has handled more than 519,300 leads. Since its establishment in 1984, NCMEC has assisted law enforcement with more than 135,800 missing child cases, resulting in the recovery of more than 118,700 children. For more information about NCMEC, call its toll-free, 24-hour hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit www.missingkids.com. N.C.M.E.C. article/information is the intellectual property of N.C.M.E.C. and subject to their terms of use. This site is not affiliated with or sponsored by N.C.M.E.C.

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M.O.S.T. Drug Series - Part 3  Khat

Courtesy https://www.dea.gov

 UPDATED 3/13/17

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What is Khat?

Khat is a flowering evergreen shrub that is abused for its stimulant-like effect. Khat has two active ingredients, cathine and cathinone.


What is it's origin?

Khat is native to East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, where the use of it is an established cultural tradition for many social situations.


What are common street names?

Common street names for Khat include: ➔Abyssinian Tea, African Salad, Catha, Chat, Kat, and Oat.


What does it look like?

Khat is a flowering evergreen shrub. Khat that is sold and abused is usually just the leaves, twigs, and shoots of the Khat shrub.


How is it abused?

Khat is typically chewed like tobacco, then retained in the cheek and chewed intermittently to release the active drug, which produces a stimulant-like effect. Dried Khat leaves can be made into tea or a chewable paste, and Khat can also be smoked and even sprinkled on food.


What is its effect on the mind?

Khat can induce manic behavior with: ➔Grandiose delusions, paranoia, nightmares, hallucinations, and hyperactivity Chronic Khat abuse can result.in violence and suicidal depression.


What is its effect on the body?

Khat causes an immediate increase in blood pressure and heart rate. Khat can also cause a brown staining of the teeth, insomnia, and gastric disorders. Chronic abuse of Khat can cause physical exhaustion.

What are its overdose effects?

The dose needed to constitute an overdose is not known, however it has historically been associated with those who have been long-term chewers of the leaves. Symptoms of toxicity include: ➔Delusions, loss of appetite, difficulty with breathing, and increases in both blood pressure and heart rate Additionally, there are reports of liver damage (chemical hepatitis) and of cardiac complications, specifically myocardial infarctions. This mostly occurs among long-term chewers of khat or those who have chewed too large a dose.


Which drugs cause similar effects?

Khat’s effects are similar to other stimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine.


What is its legal status in the United States? The chemicals found in khat are controlled under the Controlled Substances Act. Cathine is a Schedule IV stimulant, and cathinone is a Schedule I stimulant under the Controlled Substances Act, meaning that it has a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision